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Gray matter the dubious science of online dating

gray matter the dubious science of online dating-12

While his high school classmates saved up for cars, he bought himself sailplane lessons. He joined the Sport Parachute Club and spent his weekends flying to great heights in perfectly good Cessna 185's and jumping out of them.He went to college at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He felt drawn to medicine but worried that if he became a doctor, he'd never escape his father's shadow. He graduated from UNC in 1975 and enrolled in Duke medical school.

The shot of the three hosts occupied most of the right three quarters of the screen.He and his wife purchased the house in 2006, and it sits on a half acre of land in Lynchburg, Virginia, near a hospital where he used to work.Its exterior is red brick, and there are eleven windows along the front, each with white trim and black shutters, making the house look sort of Jeffersonian, sort of Monticelloesque, though it's actually only forty-nine years old, which makes it ten years younger than Alexander himself.We talk about some of the stories he tells in best-seller list nearly a year after its release.We also talk about some of the stories you won't find in the book, stories I've heard from current and former friends and colleagues, and stories I've pulled from court documents and medical-board complaints, stories that in some cases give an entirely new context to the stories in the book, and in other cases simply contradict them. Oz and Larry King and all of his other gentle interrogators have helped perpetuate, Dr. Somber because a terrible thing had happened just four days earlier, in an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut.

The three hosts, two men in dark suits flanking a woman in a blue dress, sat on a mustard-colored couch in front of a cheery seasonal backdrop: a lit-up tree, silver-painted twigs, mounds of tinsel, blue and red swatches of fabric, and, here and there, multicolored towers of blown glass with tapering points that made them look surprisingly like minarets.

The banner below the video feeds read, HOPE IS NOT LOST: NEUROSURGEON SAYS HEAVEN IS REAL."Dr. His authority on heaven hadn't come from prayer or contemplation or a vote taken at some conclave. And although a lot of people might make similar claims concerning visits to heaven and the receipt of personal revelations from God and be roundly dismissed, Dr. He was, as the Fox News Web site declared, a "renowned neurosurgeon." A man of science at the summit of the secular world.

Alexander," Carlson said, "if people don't know your story, you, you were ill, you were in a coma, you left this earth for a week, you were in heaven, and then you wrote about your experiences there, and you were told that you were supposed to come back to the earth."She paused. And when he answered the unusual question, he did so without hesitation, without hedging, and with the same fluency and authority he might exhibit when comforting a patient about an upcoming operation."Well, they will know what happened," Alexander said, and a hint of sadness swirled in his own eyes for a moment.

He's wearing jeans and a button-down shirt and a sweater vest, and he leads me through a wood-paneled study to the kitchen, where he asks if I'd like a cup of coffee. The room is homey and filled with family pictures and some paintings by friends of his wife, Holley, who's an artist and art teacher.

While the coffee brews, he explains how caffeine works. Alexander met her in college when she was dating his roommate, and now they have two sons.

Alexander faded back in, and the host to the left of Carlson, Brian Kilmeade, a compact and gruff guy with a sheaf of papers stacked on the table in front of him like a prosecuting attorney, asked a question.